Visuohaptic modes in multimedia learning

Visuohaptic is explained as providing forcefeedback to the learner while interacting with the multimedia instruction.  People familiar with gaming devices such as the joystick will make the connection to this concept.   In this article the researchers used a visuohaptic device along with multimedia learning principles and the reduction of cognitive load through scaffolding.   In the results there was a promise of better learning in the visuohaptic condition.

visualhaptic

I am posting the link to the article, http://hpcg.purdue.edu/bbenes/papers/Magana17CEJ.pdf because it is well worth a full reading as this type of research represents new ways of learning abstract concepts.

The study implemented different multimedia principles for incorporating visuohaptic simulations for learning guided by Multimedia Learning Theory. This study compared the use of visuohaptic simulations to a visual-only simulation and to instructional multimedia-only materials. The results indicated that students in the visuohaptic simulation group out-performed students in the visual-only simulation group and the instructional multimedia-only group; although not significantly. This paper discusses implications for teaching and learning with touch technologies.

Magana, A. J., Sanchez, K. L., Shaikh, U. A., Jones, M. G., Tan, H. Z., Guayaquil, A., & Benes, B. (2017). Exploring multimedia principles for supporting conceptual learning of electricity and magnetism with visuohaptic simulations. Comput Educ J.

Eye Movement Modelling Examples

While perusing an article about how self-regulated learning is affected when learning with text and pictures (Philip H. Winne, Theorizing and researching levels of processing in self-regulated learning, British Journal of Educational Psychology2017), I came across the term EMME, Eye Movement Modelling Examples.  New to me, I used Google Scholar to look into this term.  Since my oldest is a 4th year medical student, the use of EMME to improve medical education increased my interest.  (September 2012, Volume 40, Issue 5pp 813–827 Instructional Science, Conveying clinical reasoning based on visual observation via eye-movement modelling examples.)  Improvements to medical school education that highlight strategies outside of the memorization and recall model are greatly needed.

Moreover, when testing the students’ clinical reasoning skills with videos of new patient cases without any guidance, participants studying EMMEs with a spotlight showed improved their visual search and enhanced interpretation performance of the symptoms in contrast to participants in either the circle or the control condition. These findings show that a spotlight EMME can successfully convey clinical reasoning based on visual observations.

https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11251-012-9218-5

The fact that these methodologies are being used in various content fields exemplify the extent that research into visual learning and multi-media learning is expanding to the benefit of many.

Measurement of Cognitive Load

Thanks to the people at IEEE and multidisciplinary researchers, methods of measuring cognitive load are becoming more precise.   Being able to measure cognitive load means that Instructional Designers and others can determine which types of animations, text, and multimedia enhanced material has increased learning effectiveness.

An EEG-Based Cognitive Load Assessment in Multimedia Learning Using Feature Extraction and Partial Directed Coherence, MOONA MAZHER, AZRINA ABD AZIZ, (Member, IEEE), AAMIR SAEED MALIK, AND HAFEEZ ULLAH AMIN, Centre for Intelligent Signal and Imaging Research, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Seri Iskandar 32610, Malaysia Corresponding author: Azrina Abd Aziz (azrina_aaziz@utp.edu.my), July 26, 2017, date of current version August 14, 2017.Digital Object Identifier 10.1109/ACCESS.2017.2731784-3536  2017 IEEE Access.

Translations and content mining are permitted for academic research only. Personal use is also permitted, but republication/redistribution requires IEEE permission.

See http://www.ieee.org/publications_standards/publications/rights/index.html for more information.  http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/document/7992998/?denied

 

Critiques on use of mobile apps and animations for learning

Some of the research on the use of mobile apps and animations for learning shows no difference in performance, some show increased learning and some are not so sure that learning might be declining. This is nice review of various studies which also wishes to pinpoint the differences and compare not only the studies but the applications. “The ultimate goal is to provide guidelines that will help educators better identify those apps, animations, or other instructional technologies that will be most beneficial in terms of encouraging deep student understanding of course material.”

Holden, Mark and Twyman, Alexandra () “Apps and Animations: Choosing Web-based Demonstrations to Support Student
Learning,” Teaching Innovation Projects: Vol. 7 : Iss. 1 , Article 4.
Available at: http://ir.lib.uwo.ca/tips/vol7/iss1/4

http://ir.lib.uwo.ca/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1069&context=tips

Media Literacy

http://digitalcommons.uri.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1261&context=jmle
A. Song / Journal of Media Literacy Education 2017 9(1), 64 – 78
Available online at http://www.jmle.org

Critical Media Literacies in the Twenty-First Century:
Writing Autoethnographies, Making Connections, and Creating Virtual Identities

Rather lengthy article but good for finding other resources. Also contains ideas for educators to use with students to produce their own views of who they are and where they come from, to share their views and to be exposed to other views.