mLearning Standards–

Where are they?

 In many reads, e.g., edtech for higher ed type magazines and journal, there is little mention about designing courses or developing strategies that use the power of mobile technologies.  Specifically, it is rare to read anything about using mobile phones for more than sending group or individual messages regarding the online or on ground course. There is a need to look at pedagogical use of mobile devices, not just as devices for social interaction or messaging (although these are also important for learning.)  Some specifics to be examined here:

  1. The pedagogical use should include the cognitive, physical, psychological, personal and cultural factors and the of all to learning principles.
  2. ISTE standards
  3. UNESCO recommendations
  4. Adoption in other countries
  5. Rubrics and other evaluation methods
  6. Learning Objects for mobile learning
  7. Peer learning with mobile devices
  8. Combining apps with learning, camera, measurement, audio,
  9. Active engagement of learners using the apps

Also, where should higher education be headed?

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Multimedia In support of Universal Design for Learning

Transforming media from one form to another (transmedia, transduction) supports Universal Design principles and allows multiple means of expression and representation. Student engagement is greater and socialization encourages the use of multiple talents. The role of the teacher becomes that of a mentor/learner and as a resource.

Leach, A. M. (2017). Digital Media Production to Support Literacy for Secondary Students with Diverse Learning Abilities. Journal of Media Literacy Education, 9(2), 30-44.

Another look at methods that improve use of visualization and data

What do you do with thousands and tens of thousands data points and an audience that might need help in making sense of it?  Plus how do you then appreciate the thought of that audience?   These are some of the questions that the researchers had.  They investigated the use of analogy and cognitive load theory when looking at the use of data from the CERN Accessible to the General Public project.   After all science is for the public and scientists have a duty to inform and to assess their effects.

Making ATLAS Data from CERN Accessible to the General Public: The Development and Evaluation of a Learning Resource in Experimental Particle Physics, Ekelin, S., & Hagesjö, L. (2017). Making ATLAS Data from CERN Accessible to the General Public: The Development and Evaluation of a Learning Resource in Experimental Particle Physics.

http://www.diva-portal.org/smash/get/diva2:1128346/FULLTEXT01.pdf

 

Eye Movement Modelling Examples

While perusing an article about how self-regulated learning is affected when learning with text and pictures (Philip H. Winne, Theorizing and researching levels of processing in self-regulated learning, British Journal of Educational Psychology2017), I came across the term EMME, Eye Movement Modelling Examples.  New to me, I used Google Scholar to look into this term.  Since my oldest is a 4th year medical student, the use of EMME to improve medical education increased my interest.  (September 2012, Volume 40, Issue 5pp 813–827 Instructional Science, Conveying clinical reasoning based on visual observation via eye-movement modelling examples.)  Improvements to medical school education that highlight strategies outside of the memorization and recall model are greatly needed.

Moreover, when testing the students’ clinical reasoning skills with videos of new patient cases without any guidance, participants studying EMMEs with a spotlight showed improved their visual search and enhanced interpretation performance of the symptoms in contrast to participants in either the circle or the control condition. These findings show that a spotlight EMME can successfully convey clinical reasoning based on visual observations.

https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11251-012-9218-5

The fact that these methodologies are being used in various content fields exemplify the extent that research into visual learning and multi-media learning is expanding to the benefit of many.

Measurement of Cognitive Load

Thanks to the people at IEEE and multidisciplinary researchers, methods of measuring cognitive load are becoming more precise.   Being able to measure cognitive load means that Instructional Designers and others can determine which types of animations, text, and multimedia enhanced material has increased learning effectiveness.

An EEG-Based Cognitive Load Assessment in Multimedia Learning Using Feature Extraction and Partial Directed Coherence, MOONA MAZHER, AZRINA ABD AZIZ, (Member, IEEE), AAMIR SAEED MALIK, AND HAFEEZ ULLAH AMIN, Centre for Intelligent Signal and Imaging Research, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Seri Iskandar 32610, Malaysia Corresponding author: Azrina Abd Aziz (azrina_aaziz@utp.edu.my), July 26, 2017, date of current version August 14, 2017.Digital Object Identifier 10.1109/ACCESS.2017.2731784-3536  2017 IEEE Access.

Translations and content mining are permitted for academic research only. Personal use is also permitted, but republication/redistribution requires IEEE permission.

See http://www.ieee.org/publications_standards/publications/rights/index.html for more information.  http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/document/7992998/?denied

 

Weaving Together Literacies

 

Out of Stanford research, ” designed and built a web application allowing students to read and write interactive fiction and a curriculum weaving the two literacies together.  A study evaluating the curriculum found modest adoption of literacy practices from each domain. Our qualitative observations suggest a mechanism for how each literacy can support the other: . .”

Chris Proctor and Paulo Blikstein. 2017. Interactive fiction: Weaving together literacies of text and code. In Proceedings of the 2017 Conference on Interaction Design and Children (IDC ’17). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 555-560. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1145/3078072.3084324