Ongoing Research into the use of video in learning environments.

Roy Pea was one of the first researchers I cited in my PhD dissertation. Still have lots in common.

Video Analysis Tools and Techniques
Roy D. Pea Jeremy Roschelle, Randall Trigg
and more collaborators
Goal: Diverse contributions toward improving scientific understanding of learning have in the past few decades begun to pay particular attention to the situational properties of learning events. In part influenced by research methodologies in microsociology, conversational analysis, anthropology, ethology, and ethnomethodology, students of learning processes have made increasing use of video recordings of the physical and social aspects of learning environments. The increasing use of video recording as a form of data collection has the potential to revolutionize research in education and the other social sciences.

Multimedia resources for mathematics learning

 

Some research out of India has found that Excel is good medium for presenting lessons for applied linear programming.  Models, constraints and parameters can be organized in Excel spread sheets and problems solved Fig3

Global Journal of Pure and Applied Mathematics. ISSN 0973-1768 Volume 13, Number 7 (2017), pp. 2965–2973 © Research India Publications http://www.ripublication.com/gjpam.htm

Designing Multimedia Learning for Solving Linear Programming Hardi Tambunan Department of Mathematics Education, Nommensen HKBP University. Kopertis Wil. I, Jl. Sutomo No. 4A, Medan-Indonesia

Animation as an Instructional Designer’s Tool

Abstract of new chapter by Richard Mayer (2017) in the edited book:   Learning from Dynamic Visualization  Eds. Richard Lowe (1)  Rolf Ploetzner (2)     pp379-386

New Instructional Design Strategies:

  1. Visual signaling,
  2. orientation references for 3D objects,
  3. active learning strategies,
  4. organization
Date: 19 May 2017

“Animation can be a useful addition to the instructional designer’s toolbox, but techniques are needed to help guide learners’ cognitive processing during learning with animations. One technique is to add instructional design features intended to guide learners’ cognitive processing, such as adding visual signaling to guide how the learner selects and organizes material from animations depicting how a dynamic system works (e.g., De Koning & Jarodzka, 2017, this volume) or adding orientation references intended to guide how the learner selects what to attend to in animations of three-dimensional objects (e.g., Berney & Betrancourt, 2017, this volume). Another technique is to prompt the learner to use active learning strategies intended to guide how the learner selects and organizes material from the animation, such as asking the learner to produce drawings based on an animated lesson (e.g., Lowe & Mason, 2017, this volume; Stieff, 2017, this volume) or answer questions (e.g., Ploetzner & Breyer, 2017, this volume). Overall, the chapters in Parts III and IV of this volume examine how to help learners process instructional animations in ways that lead to useful learning outcomes.”

Other chapters in the book look equally helpful for instructional designers.

DynViz“The volume has recruited international leaders in the field to provide diverse perspectives on the dynamic visualizations and learning. It is the first comprehensive book on the topic that brings together contributions from both renowned researchers and expert practitioners. Rather than aiming to present a broad general overview of the field, it focuses on innovative work that is at the cutting edge.”   About this book,  http://www.springer.com/us/book/9783319562025?wt_mc=ThirdParty.SpringerLink.3.EPR653.About_eBook

Fun for students, encourages research

This article explains how to use some free apps and pictures of scientists, authors, historical figures, etc., and have students script information about them.   The free apps allow the recording of the scripts using their own voice or the voice of their choosing and then animating a still photograph so that it appears to be speaking the words.   Students would pick up numerous skills and facts in this assignment and probably have quite a bit of fun.  Engaging way to research and report.

J Microbiol Biol Educ. 2017 Apr; 18(1): 18.1.90.
Published online 2017 Apr 21. doi:  10.1128/jmbe.v18i1.1228
Photo Animation Brings Scientists Back to Life in the Classroom

Animation in Stem courses

This research report is available in full online.
The researchers used a quasi-expermental design with three groups.   They tested for various demographic variables within the groups and there were no differences.  The two experimental groups had significantly higher scores in the subject matter tested.  Nice links to 24 free animations from the North Dakota State University.   The virtual cell animation collection Available to download to mobile devices.  Also downloads with captions are available on the website.
Logo of jmbe

Home About Current Issue Submit Register Journals.ASM.org Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education
expdesign
“The instructional animation used in this study was entitled “ATP Synthase (Gradients)” and is a part of the Virtual Cell Animation Collection (NSF awards: 0086142, 0618766, and 0918955). This set of multimedia resources was developed using the research-based principles of multimedia design (4950), and they are free to use for both instructors and students.  The Virtual Cell Animation Collection currently consists of 24 animations available for either streaming or downloading in multiple formats from the project’s website (http://vcell.ndsu.edu/animations/).
J Microbiol Biol Educ. 2017 Apr; 18(1): 18.1.50.
Published online 2017 Apr 21. doi:  10.1128/jmbe.v18i1.1223
Learning about Chemiosmosis and ATP Synthesis with Animations Outside of the Classroom

Innovate Impact

Tomorrow I will be attending Innovate Impact at Ohio State University and hope to hear the latest in instructional design methods and the use of animation and visuals to improve instructional design strategies.

$DuoFinances

“With Impact as our theme for 2017, we’re sharing innovations that let educators re-imagine their instruction without sacrificing pedagogical quality and rigor. It’s fun to experiment and enjoy the novelty of cutting edge technologies, but we’re always looking at the way that technology has a positive impact on our students, instructor best practices, the educational community and beyond.

Innovate is a time for bringing people together across disciplines and across adoption barriers. The conference is built with the educator in mind: you don’t have to be tech savvy to fully participate in this day of presentations, demonstrations and valuable dialog.