mLearning Standards–

Where are they?

 In many reads, e.g., edtech for higher ed type magazines and journal, there is little mention about designing courses or developing strategies that use the power of mobile technologies.  Specifically, it is rare to read anything about using mobile phones for more than sending group or individual messages regarding the online or on ground course. There is a need to look at pedagogical use of mobile devices, not just as devices for social interaction or messaging (although these are also important for learning.)  Some specifics to be examined here:

  1. The pedagogical use should include the cognitive, physical, psychological, personal and cultural factors and the of all to learning principles.
  2. ISTE standards
  3. UNESCO recommendations
  4. Adoption in other countries
  5. Rubrics and other evaluation methods
  6. Learning Objects for mobile learning
  7. Peer learning with mobile devices
  8. Combining apps with learning, camera, measurement, audio,
  9. Active engagement of learners using the apps

Also, where should higher education be headed?

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No More Bullet Points

Found this so interesting that I need to post it. For better learning during your lectures use thoughtful, debatable questions or visuals that are thought provoking and invite alternative explanations. Engage the “audience”. Let students construct their learning. Guide when needed. You will also benefit from the ideas and explanations that are generated.

Specifically, researchers have found that comprehension often suffers when learners get lost in a barrage of distilled facts and generalizations. Bullet-point lectures rarely engage audiences in critical active learning strategies such as discussion, debate, introspection, social interaction and problem-solving. Additionally, bullet lectures often combine displayed text, spoken words and images in ways that may actually hinder comprehension and make learning more difficult (Jordan & Papp, 2013).

AuthorsMitch Ricketts (Northeastern State University, Broken Arrow) Document IDASSE-18-09-34PublisherAmerican Society of Safety Engineers

Learning Retention Study, Visual v. Written

Authors found that groups with visual teaching guides improved more than those who had text or written teaching guides.

Differences in learning retention when teaching a manual motor skill with a
visual vs written instructional aide
Alice Cade, MHSc, BSc (Chiro), Matthew Sherson, BSc, BSc (Chiro), Kelly Holt, BSc (Chiro), PhD, Graham Dobson, DC, Katie Pritchard, BSc,
BSc (Chiro), and Heidi Haavik, BSc (Chiro), PhD

http://www.journalchiroed.com/doi/pdf/10.7899/JCE-17-19?code=bthl-site

Efficacy of Multimedia Learning Modules as Preparation for Lecture-Based Tutorials in Electromagnetism

James Christopher Moore
Department of Physics, University of Nebraska Omaha, 6001 Dodge Street, Durham Science Center 127, Omaha, NE 68182, USA

Great descriptions and explanations of methods used and potential uses of Multimedia Learning Models and Tutorials in Physics as pre-instruction activities versus the lecture methodology.

Reports in gains of mid-term scores, student attitudes and post-test scores.
Potential development of mixed use of modules, tutorials and lectures in a blended environment is of interest to future designs.

http://www.mdpi.com/2227-7102/8/1/23/htm

Transactional Distance Theory and Mobile Learning

M-learning devices are suitable for furthering learning under the transactional distance theory because for the following reasons:
1. Portability means that the users have a choice of where and when and what
2. Screen sizes can vary from small to bigger; from convenient to utilitarian
3. Computing power and capacity mean instant power /off on and instant selection of applications
4. Data synchronization with other devices and the ability to discover and capture data from world-wide sources is possible for both group and individual work
5. The devices have a broad range of applications, textual, visual, social, and communicative
6. The devices have organizational capabilities (calendars, to do lists, note taking).
7. Separate hardware input devices are not needed; the only digits on one’s hand are needed
8. Users become both receivers and producers of information
9. Users are already aware of the devices’ functionalities and have experienced its usability
10. The devices allow collaboration among learners and teachers, including f2f collaboration
11. Ownership of a device equals more involvement in learning