Ongoing Research into the use of video in learning environments.

Roy Pea was one of the first researchers I cited in my PhD dissertation. Still have lots in common.

Video Analysis Tools and Techniques
Roy D. Pea Jeremy Roschelle, Randall Trigg
and more collaborators
Goal: Diverse contributions toward improving scientific understanding of learning have in the past few decades begun to pay particular attention to the situational properties of learning events. In part influenced by research methodologies in microsociology, conversational analysis, anthropology, ethology, and ethnomethodology, students of learning processes have made increasing use of video recordings of the physical and social aspects of learning environments. The increasing use of video recording as a form of data collection has the potential to revolutionize research in education and the other social sciences.

Weaving Together Literacies

 

Out of Stanford research, ” designed and built a web application allowing students to read and write interactive fiction and a curriculum weaving the two literacies together.  A study evaluating the curriculum found modest adoption of literacy practices from each domain. Our qualitative observations suggest a mechanism for how each literacy can support the other: . .”

Chris Proctor and Paulo Blikstein. 2017. Interactive fiction: Weaving together literacies of text and code. In Proceedings of the 2017 Conference on Interaction Design and Children (IDC ’17). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 555-560. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1145/3078072.3084324

 

Another NYT Media Adventure

 

Graphic Storytelling Grows Up

This time, the Times Sunday magazine was published in an all comics issue telling 12 stories of the city.  Graphic fiction has become a big seller and provides an outlet for visual storytelling.  This electronic version of the magazine has the potential to be used by students as a model for story telling and as an alternative to traditional essay or report writing.  Opens up a variety of presentation styles for instructional designers who believe in universal design for all learners.  The prestige of the New York Times gives value to the media and enhances the professionalism of graphic storytellers.

Some WOWs here for the animators learning about cultural considerations

3D Animation for Transferring Technology to the Community in Rural, International Journal of Knowledge Engineering, Vol. 2, No. 4, December 2016, Ambar Yoganingrum, Wahyoe Soeprihantoro, Agusto W. Martosudirdjo, and Ira Maryati

Not only does the animation help the rural communities learn how to make devices that can help in their daily lives, but the animators and researchers took the time to adapt the users’ needs and the users’ language to the animation.

“This research aims to analyze the usage of 3D animation for transferring technology to the rural community as well remote area. The technology in this research is an appropriate technology consisting of solar drying cabinet (SDC) and sealer as well as reservoir. Meanwhile the community is people who live in Tanjung Batang Island, a small Island in Indonesia. Interview and observation are employed in data collection. The result shows that the content of the media has to be revised by using local terms as well as more focused and detailed. The conclusion is that 3D animation could be a prospective media for transferring technology to the rural community without assistance.”

Academic selfies, self-promotion and other narcissistic behavours

Have to try a few of the described techniques. I agree with the writer. Since we have been brought up by a generation that thinks self-promotion is crass, we are sometimes at a disadvantage.

I would add, however, that our generation seems to know how to use the word and can easily overcome this deficit. Also, having a professional and artistic value, words can be interpreted by like-minded others who will discern the “pure” self-promotion from the desire to share scholarly and research interests.

Academic selfies, self-promotion and other narcissistic behavours.