Ongoing Research into the use of video in learning environments.

Roy Pea was one of the first researchers I cited in my PhD dissertation. Still have lots in common.

Video Analysis Tools and Techniques
Roy D. Pea Jeremy Roschelle, Randall Trigg
and more collaborators
Goal: Diverse contributions toward improving scientific understanding of learning have in the past few decades begun to pay particular attention to the situational properties of learning events. In part influenced by research methodologies in microsociology, conversational analysis, anthropology, ethology, and ethnomethodology, students of learning processes have made increasing use of video recordings of the physical and social aspects of learning environments. The increasing use of video recording as a form of data collection has the potential to revolutionize research in education and the other social sciences.

Kolb Learning Styles and Effects of Animation and Visuals on Learning

This is the first article that I have found that has examined Kolb’s learning style classifications with the learning from multimedia.   The researchers found that true to Mayer most students benefit from the inclusion of visuals and animations in lectures and text presentation.  However, certain students who did not have the accommodation learning style did not benefit from them.

kolbAnimation

Journal of Science and Technology, Vol. 9 No. 1 (2017) p. 7-14 Senior High School Students’ Comprehension and Interest in Science Content: Example of Participating in First-Hand Experimental Activities Pei-Hsuan Hsieh* Institute of Information Management, National Cheng Kung University  http://penerbit.uthm.edu.my/ojs/index.php/JST/article/viewFile/1404/1125

 

Visual presentations, learning styles, undergraduate engineering students

Great Methodology and Explanations in Research Study on Visual Learning Styles and Strategies
Volume 19, Number 1, 2017 © WIETE 2017 Global Journal of Engineering Education 24

“Learners with diverse backgrounds and experiences have different ways of learning that they prefer. For example, when learning new knowledge and skills, some learners prefer to see pictures and diagrams, whilst other learners prefer to listen to instructors’ verbal explanations. Most learners have multiple preferences. The different preferences are called learning styles. In past decades, a wide variety of theories or models regarding learning styles have been developed [7-11]. For instance, Kolb developed an experiential learning model based on four categories of learning styles,including diverging (concrete and reflective), assimilating (abstract and reflective), converging (abstract and active), and accommodating (concrete and active) [7]. Extensive research evidence has shown that optimal learning outcomes would be achieved when a learner’s learning styles and an instructor’s teaching styles match with each other [7-11]. According to Felder …it is important not to determine each student’s learning style and then teach to it exclusively, but to teach around the learning cycle [12]. This calls for educators to have a balanced approach from both sides of the same dimension.”
Ning Fang†, Mohd F. bin Daud‡, Syed A.H. Al Haddad‡ & Khairiyah Mohd-Yusof‡
Utah State University, Logan, United States of America†
Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, Johor, Malaysia‡

http://www.wiete.com.au/journals/GJEE/Publish/vol19no1/03-Fang-N.pdf

Some questions about “learning” outcomes

In the following thesis the author investigated the effects of using tablets on learning.  The important take away from this study is that the researcher found no effect on success rate nor on grades.  However, the students using tablet learning devices were able to display other types of learning and its effects.  Most notably the students who used tablets conducted independent research, shared their ideas with peers and in the opinion of the researcher created new knowledge.  Specifically, users reported that the tablets’ portability and storage capacity for resources enhanced usage outside the classroom and enabled communications and information sharing with peers.   Such learning outcomes are not part of standardized testing and not always included as a grading criteria but are extremely desired in the work place.

tableB

EFFECTIVENESS OF TABLET LEARNING DEVICES IN ONLINE AND BLENDED COURSES AT THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH PACIFIC by Pritika Reddy, University of South Pacific

“Interestingly, the tablet devices did not have any effect on the success rate and quality of the student grades for the respective courses they were enrolled in. The study also showed that the tablet devices were a good sharing and knowledge creating tool as the devices enabled students to conduct independent research, share ideas with peers and create new form of knowledge from the concepts they learnt.”

 

http://digilib.library.usp.ac.fj/gsdl/collect/usplibr1/index/assoc/HASH01b9.dir/doc.pdf

Animation as an Instructional Designer’s Tool

Abstract of new chapter by Richard Mayer (2017) in the edited book:   Learning from Dynamic Visualization  Eds. Richard Lowe (1)  Rolf Ploetzner (2)     pp379-386

New Instructional Design Strategies:

  1. Visual signaling,
  2. orientation references for 3D objects,
  3. active learning strategies,
  4. organization
Date: 19 May 2017

“Animation can be a useful addition to the instructional designer’s toolbox, but techniques are needed to help guide learners’ cognitive processing during learning with animations. One technique is to add instructional design features intended to guide learners’ cognitive processing, such as adding visual signaling to guide how the learner selects and organizes material from animations depicting how a dynamic system works (e.g., De Koning & Jarodzka, 2017, this volume) or adding orientation references intended to guide how the learner selects what to attend to in animations of three-dimensional objects (e.g., Berney & Betrancourt, 2017, this volume). Another technique is to prompt the learner to use active learning strategies intended to guide how the learner selects and organizes material from the animation, such as asking the learner to produce drawings based on an animated lesson (e.g., Lowe & Mason, 2017, this volume; Stieff, 2017, this volume) or answer questions (e.g., Ploetzner & Breyer, 2017, this volume). Overall, the chapters in Parts III and IV of this volume examine how to help learners process instructional animations in ways that lead to useful learning outcomes.”

Other chapters in the book look equally helpful for instructional designers.

DynViz“The volume has recruited international leaders in the field to provide diverse perspectives on the dynamic visualizations and learning. It is the first comprehensive book on the topic that brings together contributions from both renowned researchers and expert practitioners. Rather than aiming to present a broad general overview of the field, it focuses on innovative work that is at the cutting edge.”   About this book,  http://www.springer.com/us/book/9783319562025?wt_mc=ThirdParty.SpringerLink.3.EPR653.About_eBook

Fun for students, encourages research

This article explains how to use some free apps and pictures of scientists, authors, historical figures, etc., and have students script information about them.   The free apps allow the recording of the scripts using their own voice or the voice of their choosing and then animating a still photograph so that it appears to be speaking the words.   Students would pick up numerous skills and facts in this assignment and probably have quite a bit of fun.  Engaging way to research and report.

J Microbiol Biol Educ. 2017 Apr; 18(1): 18.1.90.
Published online 2017 Apr 21. doi:  10.1128/jmbe.v18i1.1228
Photo Animation Brings Scientists Back to Life in the Classroom

Animation in Stem courses

This research report is available in full online.
The researchers used a quasi-expermental design with three groups.   They tested for various demographic variables within the groups and there were no differences.  The two experimental groups had significantly higher scores in the subject matter tested.  Nice links to 24 free animations from the North Dakota State University.   The virtual cell animation collection Available to download to mobile devices.  Also downloads with captions are available on the website.
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“The instructional animation used in this study was entitled “ATP Synthase (Gradients)” and is a part of the Virtual Cell Animation Collection (NSF awards: 0086142, 0618766, and 0918955). This set of multimedia resources was developed using the research-based principles of multimedia design (4950), and they are free to use for both instructors and students.  The Virtual Cell Animation Collection currently consists of 24 animations available for either streaming or downloading in multiple formats from the project’s website (http://vcell.ndsu.edu/animations/).
J Microbiol Biol Educ. 2017 Apr; 18(1): 18.1.50.
Published online 2017 Apr 21. doi:  10.1128/jmbe.v18i1.1223
Learning about Chemiosmosis and ATP Synthesis with Animations Outside of the Classroom